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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 19, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. england's hero captain, harry kane, scores twice to give his team a winning world cup start. an injury—time goal, relief for the manager, and delight for the fans. that is what these games are about. it is the world cup, you go until the last second, and yes, absolutely buzzing. it could, though, have been so much easierfor england. they missed plenty of first—half chances, and var missed a couple of nailed—on penalties. good morning, it is tuesday 19june.
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also this morning: time to legalise cannabis. a former conservative leader calls for a decisive change in the law after a boy with epilepsy is given a special licence to use cannabis oil. delays, cancellations and now a strike. there is more disruption for passengers on northern rail. this time, staff strike over a dispute about guards on trains. tens of thousands of people were left without access to water for more than 12 hours during the bad weather in march. i will be talking to the regulator about why, in their words, too many companies were caught off—guard. and carol has the weather. good morning. we are in the garden museum in lambeth for british flowers week which runs until sunday. our flowers may flowers week which runs until sunday. ourflowers may see flowers week which runs until sunday. our flowers may see a sprinkle of water today, especially gci’oss sprinkle of water today, especially across northern ireland and scotland, where we have some rain moving on. for england and wales are cloudy start and some brightness developing in the east later. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: england have won their opening game at the football world cup, with manager gareth southgate
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declaring that the victory gives his squad a great platform to build on. the 2—1 win came courtesy of a stoppage—time goal from harry kane, in what turned out to be a nervy night in volgograd. our sports news corresponent natalie pirks was watching the action. captain, leader, not yet a legend. harry kane was one of nine players making their world cup debuts, but these young lions aren't afraid to get stuck in. after the miss came the breakthrough. a superb save fell at the feet of who else? and put in by captain kane. kane doesn't miss from there. no time for cuddles, though. there was a match to put to bed but is yet more chances went begging, a stray arm gave lacklustre opponents hope. and the referee is pointing to the spot. with just three caps to his name, jordan
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pickford almost became a hero. and he scores, right in the corner. would england have a heart to fight back? some tunisian tackles were more suited to the rugby field, and yet more english chances fell by the wayside. as they went to town, england were lacking bite. we have seen how this one ends too many times, or had we? maguire went for it, and it is in from harry kane again. two goals to the captain. that could make a huge difference to the way this world cup goes for england. talk about a release of tension. it went down well back home, as well. iwanted tension. it went down well back home, as well. i wanted to prove myself at every big stage, every big moment, so it was nice to get a goal early, and no better way to win the game in the last few minutes. well that was england's first world cup opening match wins since 2006, and didn't they looked elated ?
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opening match wins since 2006, and didn't they looked elated? they have learnt some important lessons, as well, chiefly that carelessness can cost. our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford is outside the stadium in volgograd where the match took place. good morning to you, sarah. it was a night with some nerves, but the result was good. yes, huge relief for england fans. not a huge number of them in town, around 2000 and the stadium, but they were making quite some noise during the game, of course, and when the winning goal went in we were outside by then. we heard the raw soaring over the roof of the stadium. as you can see, it is pretty quiet outside in volgograd, it was the tunisians who we re volgograd, it was the tunisians who were the noisy ones yesterday, setting off flares and singing and dancing. they were a lot quieter after the match and the england fans came out celebrating that win. a tense game, especially in the second half, but for england a result they we re
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half, but for england a result they were looking for and for the fans a great result. extremely relieved, people partying very late into the night. i could hear them very late from my hotel room. and sarah, feel free if you need to wave your arms wildly, because i know there are some fans still there this morning. they only come for a week or two weeks a year, but it happens that the bugs coincide with the world cup and as soon as you stand still they basically surround you. it is pretty disgusting, so you try not to stand still too much. the city authorities have done what they can, they have sprayed insecticide: doing a spray a month ago, and they have done it again ahead of the match, but the river behind us is basically to blame. it is nature, that is what happens, but it is a little bit difficult to content with.” happens, but it is a little bit difficult to content with. i love that we have information about an entomologist, professor adam hart, from the university of lost a share, believing they are non— biting midges, but he thinks there could be
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mosquitoes in the mix as well. inconvenient. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis, suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government's approach is out of date. let's speak to our political correspondent ben wright, who is in westminster. there is one thing about medicinal cannabis, and another on cannabis in general. the law around the medicinal use of cannabis has been called completely out of date, and that has been shown in the case of billy caldwell. he thinks they need overhauling, and on that i think he has a lot of sympathy of in the tory party, on labour benches, and across parliament. the only people who are not budging very much are the government, the home office, and
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theresa may, who while they have said there should be a review of individual cases don't seem to be keen on reopening the whole issue. what is interesting on this is that william hague goes much further and says the question of recreational cannabis use now need to be addressed. he says the so—called war on drugs, waron addressed. he says the so—called war on drugs, war on cannabis, has com pletely on drugs, war on cannabis, has completely failed and there is no chance at all of taking cannabis off the streets of britain. he says asking the police to do something about this is about as relevant as using the british army to go and reclaim the empire. it is a forceful intervention into the drugs debate and globally this question is very live. you look at the decriminalisation of cannabis in canada, there are moves in many us states to liberalise it, and william hague thinks that is exactly where this government needs to be now, plunging into the debate and facing fa cts plunging into the debate and facing facts about the recreational use of cannabis. i think this will not be welcomed by theresa may, i don't think she has any intention of budging on this, and the home office
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said last night that the government has no plans to look again at the classification of cannabis. thank you very much indeed, and we will speak to you a little bit later. just a bit of an update on the midges, i have been reliably informed by a correspondent that they bite. passengers on northern rail services are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes injust one week. members of the rail, maritime and transport union have walked out in a dispute about the role of guards. it follows existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. a minute's silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. this report from jane—frances kelly. london remembers once again. 0vernight, #londonunited was projected onto the muslim welfare house in finsbury park, where a year ago, darren 0sborne
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deliberately ploughed his van into muslim worshippers. the mayor, sadiq khan, said the projection was an act of solidarity and a symbol of unity. the message has been used to mark the four terrorist attacks that hit the capital in 2017. tasheen ahmed chawdhury and his father still vividly remember the horror. i saw the van coming towards us, and a person moved me away from there. and i saw, like, people getting hit, and some people was under the van. 51—year—old makram ali lost his life. he had collapsed in the street before the attack, but he was alive and being helped by fellow worshippers. very quiet man, very nice man, makram ali. i am all that i'm missing. the prime minister, theresa may, praised the bravery and spirit of the community and released a statement in which she said: this saturday, the islington faiths
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forum will be hosting an event at the muslim welfare house in which people from all walks of life and all faiths have been invited to remember the attack, but also celebrate the bonds of a diverse community. jane frances—kelly, bbc news. we will be talking to one of those injured. that is at 7:10am. universities should stop using predicted grades when people are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that about three quarters of applicants got worse results than their teachers had predicted. the water regulator, 0fwat, has severely criticised four water companies for their response to the storm nicknamed the ‘beast from the east.‘ the watchdog says
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poor planning meant customers were badly let down. some people were left without water for days following the big freeze and thaw. as of today, you will no longer be able to buy cosmetics containing plastic microbeads. face scrubs, toothpaste and shower gels containing tiny pieces of plastic will no longer be on sale. it is part of efforts to prevent them being washed down the drain and ending up in rivers and seas. an electric plane has made its maiden flight in norway as part of the nation's bid to tackle climate change and air pollution. the two—seater plane took a short flight around 0slo airport. a bigger one is currently being developed. norway plans to have all short—haul flights powered by electricity by 2040. it looks absolutely tiny, doesn't it? is a big enough for a person? sally, was a big enough for a
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person? you knowl sally, was a big enough for a person? you know i wasn't watching, because i was reading the paper. evenif because i was reading the paper. even if you had been watching, it was a very small plane.|j even if you had been watching, it was a very small plane. i was distracted by the picture behind both of you now. what a great moment. it is a great moment, but cani moment. it is a great moment, but can ijust moment. it is a great moment, but can i just say... moment. it is a great moment, but can ijust say... can we get a message to the england players, don't do that to harry kane! he is at the bottom, please don't do that the harry kane! he is probably braced at that moment, isn't he? we do not need him hurt. -- do that to harry kane. was there a moment in the second half where you thought here we go again? there was evidently more than one. but that man underneath all the players saved it again. lots of positives to take, then, for england, as they win a game that in previous tournaments they would have found a way to lose. harry kane scores twice, including this header in the 91st minute, as england beat tunisia in their world cup opener. what a great moment that was.
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it could, though, have been so much easierfor england. they missed loads of chances in the first half, and var missed a couple of nailed—on penalties, too. at times it looked like rugby. it is belgium who sit top of england's group this morning, though. this dries mertens belter and two from romelu lukaku helped them beat panama 3—0. and andy murray makes his return to competitive tennis this afternoon. he has missed nearly a year after having hip surgery, and plays the enigmatic australian nick kyrgios at queen's. it says in my script enigmatic, but iam not it says in my script enigmatic, but i am not sure i would call him enigmatic. isn't enigmatic when you don't know what people are thinking? i think we know what kyrgios is thinking quite a lot of the time. time for the weather. carol's at an event celebrating the best of british flowers. good morning. good morning. isn't
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this glorious. i am in the garden museum in lambeth. this archway here is designed to represent a window in a church, the beautiful stained windows that you see. it has dogwood, roses, beach and birch branches, it has lots of lovely flowers. —— beech. and british flowers week runs until sunday, it is to show the best of the flowers in season and encourage us to buy british flowers as well. our flowers will get a drink in many parts of the country. it is quite at the start, especially in the south, temperatures of 19 celsius but generally between about 15 and 18 across england and wales. northern ireland and scotland, much fresher for you this morning. we are looking at between five or six and maybe ten. if you are stepping outside you will notice a fair bit of cloud around for some of us, but some of us around for some of us, but some of us also have some sunshine. if we ta ke us also have some sunshine. if we take a look at the forecast for
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today, what you can expect is again a cloudy start, some sunshine particularly in the north of the country, but then we've got some rain coming in from the west, especially across northern ireland and scotland, as we go through the course of the day. not all of us will see it. on the pressure chart you can see that we have got a cold front which is sinking southwards. that is the demarcation between fresher air coming our way and still the warm, muggy air that we have got in the south. and it is also, that front, bringing in the rain. so this morning there is a fair bit of cloud around across southern england, northern ireland, the cloud thickenerfor some northern ireland, the cloud thickener for some patchy light rain and drizzle. we have also got the first signs of the rain coming from the weather front across northern ireland, but for much of scotland and northern england, away from that, we are looking at some sunshine. for you, the cloud will build. the cloud is big enough here and there to produce some patchy light rain and drizzle, especially in the west, and the sun will come
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out across parts of the south—east later in the day. temperatures today up later in the day. temperatures today up to about 2k, not as warm as yesterday. yesterday was 27 at heathrow. as we head on through the evening and overnight our weather front will still be producing rain across northern ireland and scotland, and you can see how it sta rts scotland, and you can see how it starts to slowly slip southwards, getting into northern england and north wales with clear spells behind it. ahead of it, still some cloud around and some clear spells further south. we start like that tomorrow, at the start in the south because we are still ahead of our weather front but that will slowly slip south during the course of tomorrow, introducing more cloud and some patchy light rain and drizzle. much later it gets into the south. kind that we are looking at sunshine and showers but some of the showers across the north—west of scotland will be hunting is. some of them merging to give longer spells of rain with some hail and thunder. into thursday, we will have early rain across the northern isles but the most of us this high pressure will be anchored across ireland. we will be anchored across ireland. we will have a settled day, so a fair bit of cloud around at times but equally we will see some sunshine,
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and temperatures we thought would get up to about 27 or 28 at rest but it looks more like we will be closer to about 26, which is still pretty good. one thing iforgot to about 26, which is still pretty good. one thing i forgot to to about 26, which is still pretty good. one thing iforgot to mention is it will be quite windy over the next few days across the far north of scotland, especially so in shetland. let's take a look at today's papers. 0ne one man on the front page of every paper. there he is. hurricane. they are also talking about cannabis —— hurricane. the war against cannabis has been irreversibly lost. they are urging to even made to legalise the drug. 0n the front page of the express, they have gone back to some of the issues around the budget. all talking about the muggy for the nhs. where is the muggy going to come
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from? that where is the muggy going to come from ? that is where is the muggy going to come from? that is reflected on the front page of the times. the hammond warning that cabinet he has no more muqqy warning that cabinet he has no more muggy to other policies after forced to find £25 billion for the nhs. it was a grey feeling last night, it also, the comments of the players immediately afterwards. there was a good vibe coming from them. in days gone by, and england team would have found a way to lose that match last night, and this england tea m match last night, and this england team found a way to wind it. they didn't give up. they lost momentum in the second half, but what you wa nt in the second half, but what you want from your then in a world cup opening match is exactly what they did last night. that is why they have him as the in. an inspirational performance. but did you notice all the wrestling? that me show you this. the mail had an interesting thing. it works really effectively
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with the stills, could you can see how much grief they were getting in the box. no penalty, and again here, arms around this neck and again here. interestingly, this was given asa here. interestingly, this was given as a penalty against england. to say it was soft is something of a understatement. it was a penalty, but if that was a penalty, that certainly was. it is interesting how referees are already talking about this world cup and there have been changes in the way we cover the world cup. more females and more referees giving their opinion as well. it is grey to hear what the referees think of that. he was definitely held back. i was screaming at the tv. that is why my voice is a bit tricky this morning. he did not shout loud enough. voice is a bit tricky this morning. he did not shout loud enoughm voice is a bit tricky this morning. he did not shout loud enough. it is just the injustice of it. you don't mind ifa just the injustice of it. you don't mind if a penalty is given when it is you, but when it isn't, it is really frustrating. the other time
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you don't mind it if you wind. because it doesn't matter. with nvidia refereed, actually there is still humid error. —— with the video referee. sometimes they get it wrong. a year taking us in a different direction? yes, talking about water. you remember all the problems with the weather in march? it caused a lot of problems that people with their water supply, so more than 200 thousand customers in england were left without water for more than four hours in england and wales. we will speak to the cheap executive in half an hour. they say there were quite a few companies thatjust didn't there were quite a few companies that just didn't have there were quite a few companies thatjust didn't have a look properly. they didn't communicate well with customers, when they did, it was confusing and sol
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well with customers, when they did, it was confusing and so i am going to talk to the chief executive about what she will do about it, because it is not on and they are not prepared. even you cannot suck with the water company, you are stuck with who you have in the area. the water company, you are stuck with who you have in the areal lovely sculpture, i don't know if you have seen this. it is made out of oil barrels. the scale of it is really something. it is intensely beautiful, by an artist and he said it is not normal art. 600 tons, 20 metres high floating sculpture made from more than 7000 colourful or you'll aral. being me, from more than 7000 colourful or you'llaral. being me, iwanted from more than 7000 colourful or you'll aral. being me, iwanted to claim on it and jump in. you should have. it is an art installation. eddiejones talking have. it is an art installation. eddie jones talking about have. it is an art installation. eddiejones talking about england fought all and we are not talking about england rugby and how difficult a time they are having. eddiejones gave a press conference
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yesterday saying he actually likes all the criticism he is getting at the moment. that is literally what he said. is that what he quoted? he says, i love it. i love it when you hate me. i love the criticism. he has this own manner of going about stuff, doesn't he? james wentworth—stanley was 21 when he took his own life following a short bout of depression. today, a new support centre named after him will be opened by the duke of cambridge. james's place will provide therapy for men experiencing suicidal thoughts. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to visit the centre with james's family. almost 12 years after this death, james's place is about to open. what a change. james was my older brother. he had a relatively short bout of anxiety, which gradually
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became increasingly severe and took him to take this own life. james's place is the first of its kind. it is nonclinical, which means it won't provide medical treatment, but free therapy for men experiencing suicidal crisis. the design is so encourages you to just sit down and relax. the building in liverpool city centre has taken 18 months to renovate. seeing it today, ifeel quite emotional because it has that very peaceful calm environment that i really wanted us to create.|j think it is absolutely the right place, the compassionate and the effective way of dealing with somebody who is feeling at their lowest, and feeling as though they might wish to take their own life. the uk suicide rate has recently dropped, but men are still three times more likely than women to take their own life. in the uk on average 84 men do so every week. perhaps
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women are more skilled at getting the support that they need before they get to that stage. so men often get to that stage feeling overwhelmed before they have even told anybody that they are struggling. being in liverpool means the centre will work alongside medicare, and nhs foundation trust that has launched a zero suicide strategy. we are trying to provide a safe and homely environment where men who are in a suicidal rises can come and receive the support that they need. i saw no other way out. i didn't see anything beyond that. john has tried to take this own life on three occasions. you get lost in the system. in other words, you can be sectioned and locked away. that is not what depressive males need. somewhere like james's place where you can come and talk would be much better and environment. it is not a clinical environment, you are not going to feel terrible coming here. you want to come here. 3000 miles
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done. tend to go. in december 2016, the day before the 10th anniversary of james's death, we set off on the day before the 10th anniversary ofjames's death, we set off on a transatlantic row. we'll was had james at the forefront of our minds for the whole duration. james would wholeheartedly love this project. and he would be extremely proud of this brother rolling the atlantic to thunder it. do i feeljames is very much a part of this project. it looks like a really beautiful place. if you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations, which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information 0800 066 066. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm alpa patel. as we've been hearing, today marks the anniversary of the finsbury park attack. last night, the north london mosque and muslim welfare house were lit up. and at 9:30 this morning, islington town hall will hold a minute's silence in remembrance of those who were affected. one man, makram ali, died, and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of people one year ago today. police are still trying to confirm if three young men, who died after being struck by a train near brixton yesterday, were graffiti artists. spray cans were found alongside their bodies, which were discovered near loughborough junction station yesterday morning. the deaths are being treated as "unexplained". academics at university college london say stress at home is more likely to cause a child to comfort—eat or lose their appetite — than their genetics. the research suggests genes
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are largely unimportant and instead, environmentalfactors — such as home life — have the biggest influence. today is the first day of racing at royal ascot, with the feature race the st james palace. racegoers have been warned that extra security measures are in place following recent disprution at the course. we have 20 is stiffer dogs covering every entrance to the racecourse. it is not an event taking drugs. it is not an event forgetting out of control in terms of what, being drunk. come to royal ascot, enjoy it how it is supposed to enjoy it and you will enjoy it be its maximum. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there's a part suspension on the overground. there's no service between willesdenjunction and camden road while a faulty train is fixed. 0n the trams — minor delays between merton park and wimbledon
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due to over running engineering works. 0n the roads — all seems well on the the marylebone flyoverfrom paddington. the m25 has one lane shut anticlockwise between j25 for enfield and j24 for potters bar because of a breakdown. and the piccadilly underpass reopened this morning after gas works last week. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. we had quite a warning here that night last night. a warm start this morning. mostly dry, cloudy and yes it will stay rather humid as well. there maybe a spot of light and drizzle this morning. it is moving out from the south and the west. it won't be until later this afternoon we might start to see something a bit brighter, some sunshine as we head towards the evening. the temperature is still reaching 24 celsius. sunshine before it set, then overnight clear spells at first and then the cloud will start to increase again from the south and
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the west. minimum temperature again feeling humid, between 14 and 16 celsius. a rather grey start tomorrow, it looks like the cloud will stay around through wednesday. humid air, 24 the maximum. a cold front sweeps through overnight wednesday into thursday morning, so temperature feeling fresh still plenty of dry weather and temperatures warming up into next week. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: england's world cup campaign got off to a winning start in russia. we will see how the result was welcomed in the pubs back home. hundreds of thousands of people were left without water in march, as the ‘beast from the east‘ caused temperatures to plummet and pipes to burst. steph will be finding out what is being done to avoid similar problems in future.
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and ellise chappell and harry richardson will be here to tell us about morwenna and drake's story of forbidden love, in the latest series of poldark. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: england have won their opening game at the football world cup, with manager gareth southgate declaring that the victory gives his squad a great platform to build on. the 2—1win came courtesy of a stoppage—time goal from captain harry kane, in what turned out to be a nervy night in volgograd. england's next match is against panama on sunday. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis, suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government's approach is out of date. yesterday the prime minister said that there was a very good reason for the current rules on cannabis and other drugs. passengers on northern rail services
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are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes injust one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in dispute about the role of guards. it follows existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. a minute's silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. the prime minister described what happened as an attack on us all. universities should stop using predicted grades when people are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that about three quarters of applicants got worse results than their teachers had predicted. as of today, you will no longer be
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able to buy cosmetics containing plastic microbeads. face scrubs, toothpaste and shower gels containing tiny pieces of plastic will no longer be on sale. it is part of efforts to prevent them being washed down the drain and ending up in rivers and seas. a hat belonging to napoleon which was salvaged from the battlefield at waterloo has been sold at auction. the famous bicorne hat, so called because it has two points, was sold for £245,000. it was expected to fetchjust £35,000. only 19 of napoleon's hats are thought to still exist. he wore them sideways so he could be spotted on the battlefield. imean, i mean, only 19. i mean, only19. iam surprised i mean, only 19. i am surprised so many exist. it sounds like quite a lot. and they are all still intact
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after a ll lot. and they are all still intact after all that fighting? and it was after all that fighting? and it was a tense night if you are an england fan, wasn't it? it started so well, and then there was that sinking feeling when everything changed. england lost a little bit of momentum, even though harry kane took them 1—0 up, tunisia scored, made it 1—1, but it all went 0k in the end. by the skin of their teeth, is. harry kane rescued the win last night with that late injury time header. they are now back at their training base, where our sport correspondent is. david, relief as much as anything. there is, england don't make it easy
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for us, and that is their third opening match win in world cup history. at least they got off the mark with a win, it is the likes of brazil, argentina, germany and spain failed to win, germany, the world champions, losing their first match. england will be delighted to have the three points in the bag, and they are fast asleep in the forest behind us now. they arrived back at 6am local time, at 4am your time, and they will train later today. a great save by the tunisia goalkeeper, but harry kane to score his first tournament goal and continue his fine run as captain in internationals. it went a little wrong, as you said, kyle walker conceding a penalty, which was put away by ferjani sassi for tunisia. nervous moments for england. we thought here we go again, but very late on, into stoppage time, harry
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kane popped up again and it was to bea kane popped up again and it was to be a celebratory night for england. a relatively small number of fans inside the arena in volgograd, and they were able to celebrate long into the night. harry kane, how precious for england. five goals in his last four games, eight in his six as england captain, and his manager, gareth southgate, full of praise for a player who could prove so crucial for england in this campaign. he is a top, top striker, isn't he? i am delighted for him because if he doesn't score tonight we will ask questions about him not scoring goals in tournament football, won't we? it is greatly have him in the team, and he took his goals really, really well.|j have him in the team, and he took his goals really, really well. i am glad you have explained the logistics of where you are a little bit. so the players are asleep in
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the forest behind you. it appears you are on a beach by a rather beautiful lake. so everything is calm and serena, but it wasn't last night. and var, the video referee, didn't all go smoothly. this is the first time that we have seen var used at a world cup, and it has proved slightly controversial so far. certainly last night, because those of you watching will have seen some rough tactics from the tunisian defenders, especially towards harry kane. it seemed like he was involved more ina kane. it seemed like he was involved more in a rugby match at times than a football match, and this is why we are using var, so an assistant in moscow can spot incident is not seen by the referees, and kane being by the referees, and kane being rugby tackled to the ground not once, not twice, and other england players on the other end of some hostile treatment. it was not picked
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up hostile treatment. it was not picked up by hostile treatment. it was not picked up by video officials, and that would have been a huge controversy had england not got what they feel is justice and come out of the match with a win. that will surely be a talking point, and questions for the organisers, fifa, to answer. we are on the gulf of finland, a blustery morning after what has been a very calm setting throughout this world cup so far. england about 20 minutes drive down the coast behind me in from the sea, in a hotel, and they are resting up after that late night. and later today, at around 2:15pm our time, 12:15pm night. and later today, at around 2:15pm ourtime, 12:15pm in night. and later today, at around 2:15pm our time, 12:15pm in the uk, they will have another session. and then we will hear from some of the players a little later on. so far so good for england, and they move on on sunday for their second match against panama. ijust want
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on sunday for their second match against panama. i just want to on sunday for their second match against panama. ijust want to know, how does david get that gig on the beach? it looks dutiful, doesn't it? glad that the players are safely tucked up in their beds. loads of reaction from the players after the match. from jesse lingard, captain harry kane, and england also posted a picture of gareth soutgate phoning home after the match. i think this is the one from jess lingard, but this is the pile in, and this is harry kane, a brilliant shot of him. but i love this, this is gareth southgate, the stadium emptying, all peaceful, all quiet, and he is phoning home after the match. and of course they then got ona match. and of course they then got on a plane and flew home through the night. harry kane's injury—time winner was cheered loudly in volgograd, and here at home, as holly hamilton reports. england fans have had four years to
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shake off the disappointment of their last world cup performance, one they probably want to forget. but, with the curtain rising on gareth southgate's campaign in russia, a clean slate. new manager, new captain, new tactics, but other fa ns new captain, new tactics, but other fans feeling confident?” new captain, new tactics, but other fans feeling confident? i am hoping we are going to get through to the semis, yes. we are going to smash our round. quarterfinals, lose the brazil in the quarterfinals. even getting to the round of 16 is going to be an achievement for us. they have played so well so far, i think they will smash it. you never know, we just hope they will smash it. you never know, wejust hope for they will smash it. you never know, we just hope for the best. no celebrations here at half—time, as tunisia levelled the score line. no one said being a football fan was easy. i feel like it wasn't a penalty. tunisia is a team we should be beating quite comfortably. hang in there, england fans. here comes
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harry kane. you can't help but wonder, what would they do if they actually won the world cup? well, elsewhere, belgium top england's group after overcoming debuta nts panama. they struggled in the first half, before dries mertens added his contender for goal of the tournament. two goals from manchester united's romelu lukaku completed a 3—0 win. 0ur old friend var was centre—stage in the sweden—south korea match. the referee didn't initially see this as a foul, but changed his mind on reviewing the tape. hard has it was for fans to watch, captain andreas granqvist scored the penalty that gave the swedes a 1—0 win. after a year out with a hip injury,
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andy murray will return to action later. the former world number one will be taking on australian nick kyrgios in the first round at queen's. the two are friends, which kyrgios thinks will help murray. meanwhile, britain's rising tennis star cameron norrie is out of queen's. he was beaten in straight sets by the three—time grand slam champion stan wawrinka, who looked comfortable as he continues his comeback from knee surgery. scotland play a t20 match in the netherlands today, while england play their third one day international against australia. england will be without the injured pair ben stokes and chris woakes for the match in nottingham. they are 2—0 up in the five—match series before they play the tourists in a t20 match. i told you there was lots more sport stories, and loads more we can't even fit in. more from me in the
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next hour. passengers who use northern rail services know only too well about delays and cancellations since the introduction of a new timetable last month. but today sees the first of three planned strikes this week in a long—running dispute over the role of guards. the walkout is by members of the rail, maritime and transport union. mick cash from the rmt is in our london newsroom. very good morning to you. thank you very much for your time. could you just give us a sense of what the action will comprise in the next few days? well, we've got three days of industrial action. i don't know if you and your viewers are aware, but northern normally run 800,000 trains a year, every single one, as we stand, have a guard on and if they get their way, over stand, have a guard on and if they get theirway, over400,000 stand, have a guard on and if they get their way, over 400,000 will be running without a guard in future. so that they can make tens of millions of pounds of savings over the franchise. now, we don't need to be here. we've got deals in scotland and wales, we have suspended action
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on south—western trains yesterday because we are going to have meaningful talks. but we can't have meaningful talks. but we can't have meaningful talks, because they don't seem to want to sit down and do a deal to keep safety guards on trains. this strike action, you will be well aware, comes at a time when northern rail passengers have been suffering especially badly. this will make things worse, when it? well, we don't want to make things worse. passengers in the north of england know how shambolic that company is run and they understand how shambolic the negotiations have been. we have been in dispute for over a year, 14 months. this year alone we have met the company twice to try and get this dispute resolved, and yet we cannot get meaningful discussions with them. we are frustrated as the passengers are. our members, you know, they wa nt to are. our members, you know, they want to provide a good save service to passengers, we want to make sure the railway is safe, secure and accessible, but it is quite clear
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that they do not want to sit down and have meaningful discussions with us, so we've got no other choice. just looking at the comments from richard allen, northern's managing director, we prepared to guarantee jobs until 2025, but both guarantees depend on rmt ending its strike action. what do you make of that commitment, that they had said? well, i mean, i have met richard, and he knows what resolves this dispute and he is refusing to give us the guarantee we have got elsewhere of keeping a second safety critical person on the train. they can critical person on the train. they ca n afford critical person on the train. they can afford to do it, the company makes a lot of profits and they have turned around and will get a lot of money for actually... whether or not the industrial action happens, they will get paid by the taxpayer and passengers for the disruption both in timetables and for the dispute. i am disappointed that they won't sit
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down and have meaningful discussions like other employers well. i can't understand why we can get deals in scotland, deals in wales, we are very close to another train operating company where we have a deal coming down the track, and we have suspended industrial action on south—western railway is just yesterday because we had meaningful discussion, but with these people we can't. the company is shambolic, and the way they have been running these timetables, they will not have negotiation. if the strike action begins today, the 19th, the 21st on the 23rd ofjune, if the offer of talks were to emerge this morning, is this still a possibility that strikes would be called off? the last six months, we have only had a lock and nothing has happened. that is an absolute disgrace. it is
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shambolic the way they are negotiating. the way they are operating the rain service and negotiations is shambolic. we will consider any offer of meaningful talks, but i wouldn't raise my hopes ifi talks, but i wouldn't raise my hopes if i was you. thank you for your time this morning. time for the weather. carol is at an event celebrating the best of british flowers. ididn't i didn't even know the garden museum existed. good morning.” i didn't even know the garden museum existed. good morning. i amjoined by camilla. you have put together this beautiful installation with your partner. tell us about it. we grow our own flowers and we wanted to create an installation that showed how overgrown your block can become, the constant battle with nature to keep it under control.m is stunning, it is messy but organised case. what flowers have
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you got? we have lovely seasonal british flowers, roses, foxgloves, nigella, so many lovely flowers. they are gorgeous. we will take a closer look at them later on. if you have any flowers in your garden that you think are stunning, maybe think more stunning than camilla's, please get in touch with us. send us your pictures or tweet us your pictures. pollen levels today are higher, very high across most of england and wales. they are low across northern scotland. the forecast for today is one that involves some rain. rain coming in from the west and we will see that coming into the north as well through the day. a cloudy start. still quite a muggy start as well, particularly across part of southern england where the temperature hasn't fallen below 18 or19 temperature hasn't fallen below 18 or 19 celsius overnight, whereas in the north it is between five and six and nine. you can see a cold front
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slipping south across the uk. that is what will introduce the rain and it will also introduce some fresh conditions behind it. in the south, muqqy conditions behind it. in the south, muggy weather today. fresh conditions in the north. we start off with sunshine in the north across parts of scotland and northern england, more cloud through wales in southern england. thick enough for the odd spot of light rain or drizzle. we have some murky conditions across the south—west and the channel islands. by the afternoon, raining to scotland as well, but starting to brighten up across parts of the south—east later on. we will hang on to some sunshine across the north—east of scotland where it will be windy. temperatures up where it will be windy. temperatures up to 24. our weather front continues its descent south was, taking it to rain and slipping into north wales and northern england through the night. some clear skies behind it, a lot of cloud ahead of it with some clear skies in the fast out. tomorrow we start off with a
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weather front, as it out. tomorrow we start off with a weatherfront, as it continues its descent south east and will bring a lot of cloud with it and it will tend to weaken so we will have patchy light rain and drizzle which will eventually tends to fizzle. it will eventually tends to fizzle. it will get into the far south of england much later. behind it, brighter skies and sunshine but also some showers. some digging showers across the north west of scotland. hailand across the north west of scotland. hail and thunder and light thing. it will still be like. lots of rain at the shetland but the high pressure is anchored across ireland. things will be fairly settled. there will be moments of cloud but equally sunshine. temperature is not as high as it. they were going to be on thursday. with a 27 or 28. it is still likely around to be 26. thank you very much. there was no excuse for the disruption to water supplies when the ‘beast from the east‘ hit the uk in march — that‘s according to a new report
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from the water watchdog. steph‘s here with more. it caused a fair amount of chaos in many senses. yes, this is a report from the water regulator 0fwat into what went wrong when the ‘beast from the east‘ hit a few months ago. they‘ve found that 200,000 people had their water supplies disrupted, and they‘ve said "too many companies were caught off guard." here‘s a look back at what happened. i have five kids and literally
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without water since six o‘clock yesterday morning. it is terrible. washing the bottles is a bit difficult, a lot of stuff covered in baby to that i can't wash. they said that what is fixed. —— in the water. that is a reminder of what happened. well, 0fwat has singled out four companies in particular for theirfailures — thames water, severn trent water, southern water and south east water. let‘s talk to rachel fletcher who is the chief executive of 0fwat. good morning. thank you forjoining us. what do these companies do ron, do you think? they think we are not properly prepared, we didn‘t have enough information about what was going on on their systems, and they
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we re going on on their systems, and they were really poor at communicating with their customers and helping them understand what was going on and when things would get fixed. them understand what was going on and when things would get fixedm is not a shock in this country to get bad weather, so why were they not prepared? they haven't learned the lessons from previous weather events like this. they haven‘t thought through what would happen if you got a very, very rapid thaw. and they just didn‘t you got a very, very rapid thaw. and theyjust didn‘t have the standby arrangements, people who could come in and get on the telephone line and handle customer queries. some really, really basic things need to be put right. the grey thing is actually that some companies did a greyjob of actually that some companies did a grey job of rejecting actually that some companies did a greyjob of rejecting there are customers during this period. there area customers during this period. there are a lot those companies can learn. as the regulator, what are you going to do about it? we have said those four companies have until the end of september to come back to us with plans that assure us they have learned their lesson and that they can better protect the customers the
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next time and if they don‘t, if we are not satisfied with their response, we will take action against them. what does that mean? we have powers to take on for seduction, to fine the companies, if we really feel they fail their customers and let them down. we are ready to use those powers. very recently against thames for failing their leakage commitments to customers. given you said you don't feel they have learnt lessons from the past, why are you even giving them three months to tell you what they have learnt this time? surely they have learnt this time? surely they should just beyond that now. the good thing is the best thing actually for everybody is that the companies take those lessons on board, get the arrangements in place so that customers get a better service around. but they absolutely had to pull their socks up and grip it and convince us they have done so. what are the tough things are customers is the fact that you can‘t change to your water supply is. what
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can customers do if they are unhappy? customers have a right to complain if they are not happy with the service that they have had, those complaints need to be taken seriously and those avenues if they are not satisfied. equally, customers in the most affected areas over the winter did actually get compensation from their companies, and if they feel that they haven‘t had that conversation that was due to them, if they were off the price of 1224 hours, they should get on and ask their customers to put that right. you can contact the company to try and get compensation? yes, all the companies who had badly affected customers should have been in touch with those customers already, providing them with compensation automatically. if anyone feels they have mist out, they should get on to their water company. are you confident this will not happen again? i am asking that
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four companies in particular to assure us that it won‘t happen again. are you confident there will listen? are you confident we won‘t have this next time —— but this time next year? we have provided them with a detailed report cloud, showed them what other companies did in the north in particular of england where there was some really examples of good performance for customers. there is a lot to learn, a lot for the industry as a whole to do together, cooperatively, and in particular they need to get better at identifying people in vulnerable situations and getting special support to those customers in particular. interesting. thank you for your time this morning. we appreciate you coming in to talk to us. still to come on breakfast — for many years, disney characters were used to promote sugary cereals and fast food, but now, the company‘s changed its tune. we‘ll be hearing why. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i‘m alpa patel. as we‘ve been hearing, today marks the anniversary of the finsbury park attack. last night, the north london mosque and muslim welfare house were lit up. and there will be a minute‘s silence at 9:30 this morning. one man — makram ali — died, and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd a year ago. police are still trying to confirm if three young men who died after being struck by a train near brixton yesterday were graffiti artists. spray cans were found alongside their bodies, which were discovered near loughborough junction station yesterday morning. the deaths are being treated as "unexplained". investigations are continuing after parts of several buildings collapsed on a busy pavement in north—west london yesterday. the facades of the buildings collapsed in brent street in hendon yesterday. it‘s believed nobody was hurt.
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academics at university college london say stress at home is more likely to cause a child to comfort—eat or lose their appetite — than their genetics. the research suggests genes are largely unimportant and instead, environmentalfactors — such as home life — have the biggest influence. today is the first day of racing at royal ascot. racegoers have been warned that extra security measures are in place following recent disprution at the course. we have 20 is stiffer dogs covering every entrance to the racecourse. it is not an event for taking drugs. it is not an event for getting out of control in terms of getting drunk. come to royal ascot, enjoy it how it is supposed to enjoy it and you will enjoy it be its maximum. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s a part suspension on the overground with no service between willesdenjunction and camden road due to a faulty train.
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minor delays on the rest of the route. 0n the roads — this is the approach to the blackwall tunnel, traffic there building during the rush hour. in crystal palace, crystal palace park road is blocked, both ways on the northern side of the park, because of an accident between westwood hill and chulsa road. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we had quite a warm and humid night last night. many temperatures didn‘t drop below 18. a warm start this morning. mostly dry, cloudy and, yes, it‘s going to stay rather humid as well. now, i say mostly dry — there may be a spot of light rain and drizzle this morning on the thicker areas of the cloud. it‘s moving out from the south and the west. now, it won‘t be until later on this afternoon we might start to see something a bit brighter, some sunshine just as we head towards the evening. the temperature, though, despite the cloud is still reaching 24 celsius. so, some sunshine potentially before it sets, then overnight, clear spells at first, then the cloud will start to increase again from the south and the west. quite misty and murky. minimum temperature again feeling humid, between 14 and 16 celsius.
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so a rather grey start tomorrow, it looks like the cloud‘s going to stay around during the course of wednesday. still have the humid air, though — 24 the maximum. then a cold front sweeps through overnight wednesday into thursday morning, so the temperature feeling a bit fresher for thursday. still plenty of dry weather and temperatures warming up into next week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. england‘s hero captain, harry kane, scores twice to give his team a winning world cup start. an injury—time goal, relief for the manager, and delight for the fans. that‘s what these games are about. it‘s the world cup — you go until the last second, and yeah, absolutely buzzing. it could, though, have been so much easierfor england.
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they missed plenty of first—half chances, and var missed a couple of nailed—on penalties. good morning, it is tuesday 19june. also this morning: time to legalise cannabis. a former conservative leader calls for a decisive change in the law after a boy with epilepsy is given a special licence to use cannabis oil. delays, cancellations and now a strike. there is more disruption for passengers on northern rail. it has been a difficult year for the aviation industry. this morning, we will find out how low—cost airline flybe is faring. they have been cutting back on unprofitable routes, but has it improved performance? i‘ll have more shortly.
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and carol has the weather. good morning from the garden museum, in lambeth. we are here to celebrate british flowers week. some of the flowers outside will be getting a drink with rain and the forecast across parts of northern ireland and later scotland. further south, a bit of cloud around but that will break up of cloud around but that will break upfor of cloud around but that will break up for some of us allowing sunny spells to develop. i will have more details on 15 minutes. —— in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: two goals from captain harry kane ensured victory for england in their world cup opener. it was a bit of a nervy night in volgograd, but manager gareth southgate declared that the win gives his squad a great platform to build on. 0ur sports news corresponent natalie pirks was watching the action. captain, leader, not yet a legend. harry kane was one of nine players making their world cup debuts, but these young lions aren‘t afraid to get stuck in. after the miss came the breakthrough. a superb save fell at
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the feet of — who else? put in now, though, and put in by captain kane. kane doesn‘t miss from there. no time for cuddles, though. there was a match to put to bed. but, as yet more chances went begging, a stray arm gave lacklustre opponents hope. and the referee‘s pointed to the spot. with just three caps to his name, jordan pickford almost became a hero. and he scores, right in the corner. would england have the heart to fight back? some tunisian tackles were more suited to the rugby field, and yet more english chances fell by the wayside. as the midges went to town, england were lacking bite. we had seen how this one ends too many times. 0r had we? maguire went for it, and it is in from harry kane again. two goals to the captain. that could make a huge difference
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to the way this world cup goes for england. talk about a release of tension. it went down well back home, as well. obviously i want to prove myself on every big stage, every big moment. so it was nice to get a goal early, and no better way to win the game, in the last few minutes. well, that was england‘s first world cup opening match win since 2006, and didn‘t they looked elated. they have learnt some important lessons, as well — chiefly that carelessness can cost. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford is outside the stadium in volgograd where the match took place. i have been watching the last couple of moments, those bugs really are insufferable, aren‘t they? a nervy night, and the bugs didn‘t help either. the bugs weren't great last night and they are even worse this morning but it obviously didn‘t stop the team in the end. the result that
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england were looking for and a great reaction from the england fans. they we re reaction from the england fans. they were not as many in the stands as you might expect to follow england ina you might expect to follow england in a world cup but they made quite some noise and the role which came out where i was standing at the end of the match last night was incredible. the celebrations went on very late into the night, and kevin miles was here from the supporters‘ federation, he can maybe tell us a little more about how he felt as a fan and with the fans celebrating yesterday. a nailbiting second half. it was, and when you look at some of the teams which didn't win their first game, the relief to get some points on the board was palpable. what was the reaction like in town after the win? it was incredible, but it is fair to say people were quite tired, it was quite draining experience. it was all very positive and rounded off what has been a really good couple of days in volgograd. people have been bowled over, i have been astounded by the
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numberof over, i have been astounded by the number of people who have come to tell their stories, the welcome, the reception, the kindness they have experienced. 0ne reception, the kindness they have experienced. one of the problems with volgograd it is volgograd is that it with volgograd it is volgograd is thatitis with volgograd it is volgograd is that it is not a tourist destination, but it has been such a positive experience that the goal at the end capped it off nicely.” positive experience that the goal at the end capped it off nicely. i hope the end capped it off nicely. i hope the fun goes on to the next couple of games at least for the fans. he was saying a much warmer reaction than many english fans were expecting, certainly the first day when people started arriving, eagle we re when people started arriving, eagle were not wearing their shirts, a little bit wary of the reception they might get, and things turned out to be extremely good fun, all in good spirits. the only thing which is bothering most people is these horrific midges, which won‘t leave people alone. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis — suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated,
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shows the government‘s approach is out of date. let‘s speak to our political correspondent ben wright, who is in westminster. lord haig is a significant figure, what will people make of his comments —— lord hague. what will people make of his comments -- lord hague. he is, former tory leader until relatively recently a conservative foreign secretary, and i think his voice resonates within british politics still. he has said that the case around billy caldwell and the confiscation of his cannabis oil shows that the laws around the medicinal use of cannabis are, in lord hague‘s words, indefensible, beyond ridiculous and utterly out of date. 0n beyond ridiculous and utterly out of date. on that front he shares the view many in parliament hold, who look at this case with incredulity and think much more needs to be done to make that law makes sense for
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patients. what is so interesting is that lord hague goes much further and says the whole issue of the recreational use of cannabis needs to be looked as well. he says the idea that can somehow take cannabis off the streets is deluded, he says asking police to try and do that is like asking the british army to go and refight and reclaim the british empire. it is simply impossible, it is not going to happen. he looks at countries like canada and the us where there is dramatic liberalisation of recreational cannabis use going on now, and he says perhaps the conservatives should be pushing that sort of policy agenda here as well. theresa may, in her time at the home office and as prime minister, has said that she has no —— has shown no desire to examine the issue. they are likely to brush it off. passengers on northern rail services are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes injust one week.
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members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute about the role of guards. it follows existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. 0ur reporterjudy hobson is at manchester piccadilly station. 0nce once again, people facing disruption. what is the latest? absolutely, more misery for passengers here today. this strike started at midnight and runs until midnight this evening. northern are hoping to run half of their planned services, mainly between now and 7pm this evening. it is all about the role of guards, as you say. northern are bringing in some new trains, which a modern, they say they are very safe and don‘t need guards, and those guards can be freed up for other roles with passengers. the rmt says they don‘t think that is true, they say it is unsafe not to have guards on trains, even on short journeys. they say they are highly skilled in safety on trains, fires,
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anti—social behaviour, helping people with mobility issues get on and off the trains. the problem is this has been going on for over a year, this is the 21st strike day and there is no movement, no negotiations. they have only met twice in all that time and neither side is giving in. speaking to passengers this morning, they have more sympathy with the rmt than they do with northern, who really are producing a very shoddy service, as you know, at the moment. a minute‘s silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. this report from jane—frances kelly. london remembers once again. 0vernight, #londonunited was projected onto the muslim welfare house in finsbury park, where a year ago, darren 0sborne deliberately ploughed his van into muslim worshippers. the mayor, sadiq khan, said the projection was an act
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of solidarity and a symbol of unity. the message has been used to mark the four terrorist attacks that hit the capital in 2017. ta hseen ahmed chowdhury and his father still vividly remember the horror. i saw the van come towards us, and a person, like, move me away from there. and i saw, like, people getting hit, and some people was under the van. 51—year—old makram ali lost his life. he had collapsed in the street before the attack, but he was alive and being helped by fellow worshippers. very quiet man, very nice man, makram ali. i am all the time missing him. the prime minister, theresa may, praised the bravery and spirit of the community and released a statement in which she said: this saturday, the islington faiths forum will be hosting an event at the muslim welfare house in which people from all walks of life and all faiths have been
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invited to remember the attack, but also celebrate the bonds of a diverse community. jane frances—kelly, bbc news. we will be talking to someone who was there on that night in just a few minutes. universities should stop using predicted grades when people are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that about three quarters of applicants got worse results than their teachers had predicted. the water regulator, 0fwat, has severely criticised four water companies for their response to the storm nicknamed the ‘beast from the east.‘ the watchdog says poor planning meant customers were badly let down. some people were left without water for days following the big freeze and thaw. as of today, you will no longer be able to buy cosmetics containing plastic microbeads.
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face scrubs, toothpaste and shower gels containing tiny pieces of plastic will no longer be on sale. it is part of efforts to prevent them being washed down the drain and ending up in rivers and seas. those are the main stories. we have all the sport and the weather for you coming up shortly. the finsbury park terror attack, which took place on this day last year, has been described by theresa may as vile extremism. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of people near a north london mosque. let‘s speak to yassin hersi, who was one of those hurt, and khalid 0umar, a trustee of the finsbury park mosque. very good morning to you both, thank you so much for your time. i wonder, ifi you so much for your time. i wonder, if i could ask you first, you were there on the occasion, and you went
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to help makrim ali after he collapsed in the street, you tried to give him first aid. what are your recollections of those moment —— makram ali. my recollection was makram ali. my recollection was makram ali. my recollection was makram ali was coming out of the mosque, and he was literally walking one metre away from me, and hejust collapsed on the floor. i tried to help him, and that is when the incident took pace, actually. because you were then hit by the car as you were trying to help him. yes, idid indeed, as you were trying to help him. yes, i did indeed, so as i was helping him,i i did indeed, so as i was helping him, iwas... i did indeed, so as i was helping him, i was... the group of people had been gathering where makram ali had been gathering where makram ali had collapsed, and all tried to
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help, and then we all were hit. and the car that was driven into you, what was the nature of your injuries, and how are you now? well, i think there is a lot of things going on in our life at the moment, it is getting better now. but there are other things we are suffering now. emotionally, mentally, verbally, physically, somehow. pain. it was interesting, at the time, there was a great deal of praise for there was a great deal of praise for the community about how people rallied around, and that is ongoing, asi rallied around, and that is ongoing, as i understand it. tell us a little bit about how this incident has affected the area. it is obviously... a year on, it was a bad yearfor londoners. it obviously... a year on, it was a bad year for londoners. it was a very difficult yearfor year for londoners. it was a very difficult year for islington residents and surrounding areas. but
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really, it showed, really, how people came together for the good of all the community. they came from all the community. they came from all walks of life, from different faiths, from no faith, it really was inspirational to see the amount of support that the community got. in fa ct, support that the community got. in fact, most of the survivors were inspirational also for the rest of the community, for them to come out and to show through that big test, shall i say, and something which we never expected to feel, to feel that the community can actually handle such adversity. but let me tell you this. if we are talking about the memorial, it was something for the whole community. as i keep saying, once again, it shows three things. the first one, that wounds will heal. number two, that we will recover, and that we are determined to go about our lives, and that we will be stronger. that was the message, and we will continue to deliver it to all sides of the
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community. extremism has no place in society, violence, hatred, and racism, it has no place in today‘s society. and i thank every community member that came out and showed how the british values should be demonstrated and upheld. 0n on that theme, this was a crime carried out in hatred, wasn‘t it, andi carried out in hatred, wasn‘t it, and i am gathering from you and the people they‘re, that was the one thing you are not going to show in return, that you ago to show you had solidarity rather than hatred. is that how you see it? i think the message we have been delivering since the beginning is united. united against terrorists and extremists. united about racism and islamaphobia and united against drugs and all the bad rings. the community show really good solidarity and we are getting there.
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—— bad things. we are talking about flowers today. carol is at an event celebrating the best of british flowers. they do look lovely, carol, mourning. yes, they are. the garden museum, a beautiful archway of hours. some lovely jasmine. museum, a beautiful archway of hours. some lovelyjasmine. a museum, a beautiful archway of hours. some lovely jasmine. a lovely archway, held up by some beech and birch and we have roses in front of us. but rings me to the pollen levels which are high across much of england and wales. moderate again —— across south—west england and moderate across scotland and northern ireland. the forecast today isa northern ireland. the forecast today is a warm one in the south, quite muggy. it has been a mighty night.
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temperatures in the south didn‘t fall temperatures in the south didn‘t fa ll lower temperatures in the south didn‘t fall lower than 15 and 19 celsius. fresher in the north where we have had two bridges as low as five in northern ireland and six in scotland. —— temperatures. we also have rain coming in in the north and west. the weather fronts sinking slowly southwards and that is the weather front marking fresher conditions in the north and the muqqy conditions in the north and the muggy conditions in the south. if you follow the weather front along, you follow the weather front along, you see the other end of it. that will produce rain which is already in parts of northern ireland and later on that will spill across all of northern ireland and parts of western scotland. this morning, at cloudy start for many of us but not so across northern england and scotla nd so across northern england and scotland where you are off to a sunny start. that will change as we go through the day. at the weather front approaches, we will find more cloud coming in and then we will see the rain coming in across northern ireland and western scotland. windy in the north, too. where we have all the cloud across southern areas, it
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will brighten up with sunny skies developing across central, southern and eastern england. we will hang on to some murk in the hills but the temperature today will be around 24. not quite set —— 27 that we had at heathrow yesterday, the warmest in the uk. this evening and overnight, the uk. this evening and overnight, the weather front produces more rain across northern ireland, much of scotla nd across northern ireland, much of scotland and as it slips south, it will go into wales. a lot of cloud ahead of the clear skies with some mist and fog patches developing. five south will hang on to some fog patches. the weakest feature will bring some cloud, patchy light rain and drizzle and it won‘t get into the far south of england until much, much later in the day. behind it, the northern england, northern ireland and scotland, we will see at brighten up but there will be sent showers across the north and west
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where they will be heavy, thundery and hailat where they will be heavy, thundery and hail at times will stop the high—pressure system anchored itself over ireland and after some early rain in shetland, things will be fairly quiet. they will be some still weather and a lot of dry weather. some cloud around but equally, some sunny skies. not as hot as it was going to be. we thought we would seek temperatures up thought we would seek temperatures up to 28 on thursday. it is more likely to be 26. by the time we get to thursday, friday, the end of the week, all of us will be having fresher conditions but by no means will it be cold, it will be fairly settled as well. thank you, carol. it‘s been a difficult year for the aviation industry — and in the last few minutes the no—frills airline flybe has announced losses. steph‘s here to tell us more. the exact figures are that they made a loss of £19.2 million to the end of march. that compares to 6.7 million loss the previous year. some
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big numbers. the reason why is the bad weather. a couple of months ago when we had the beast from the east, we had storms, a lot of chaos for anyone using the transport system at whether you are a fly in all rail or water supplies, that really hit flybe hard. so they had to cancel nearly 1000 flights in the first three months of this year. if you compare it to the previous era that time, a cancelled just less than 4000 -- 400. the time, a cancelled just less than 4000 —— 400. the previous year. it has cost them a lot of money. how big are flybe? if you look at how many passengers use them every year, it is 9.5 million people. that is where the good news is that m. although they have been hit hard by the weather and that has affected their products which has made them make a loss, if you look at their passenger numbers, they have gone up. —— that is where the good news is for them. the amount of money
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they are making per seat, the revenues, that has gone up as well. they are saying that the outlook for them is quite good. if you think about it, a lot of their business comes from the business community trying to get around the uk quite easily. it is not holidaymakers, necessarily. it is the infrastructure travelling around the uk so it isa infrastructure travelling around the uk so it is a mixed picture for them. tough numbers but they think things will get better. debenhams have also put out a profit warning. a massive retailer. they have specifically set against a background of increase, lots of people bringing down their prices, they have struggled. they said they are not going to make as much money as they thought they were for may and earlyjune. we will get more details on that. walt disney is the name behind some of the most popular children‘s films of all time, and its characters have been used to promote everything from fast food to breakfast cereals. but the company says that‘s changing, and the food its associated with must meet official guidelines on sugar, fat and salt. it‘s also stopping adverts for unhealthy foods on its tv channels and in its magazines.
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matt grossman from disney is with us now. is this a sudden change of heart and why? it is a long-standing commitment of the walt disney co. to use the characters that you guys mentioned, the passion the kids have, to really connect and help make healthy living easier everyday. really, for me, the two things that we wa nt really, for me, the two things that we want to talk about are both food and getting active. getting active is one place that is for me, really quickly, we have partnered with public health england over the last four years to get kids up and moving because of course, it is about 300 million extra minutes of time, all of these things compromise what i like to call positive pester power. we wa nt
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like to call positive pester power. we want our characters to get things wanting to do the things that we as pa rents wanting to do the things that we as pa re nts wa nt wanting to do the things that we as parents want them to do.” wanting to do the things that we as parents want them to do. i adjust thinking, some people might be thinking, some people might be thinking you are a little late to the party. there have been a lot of stories about what our children are eating. you are a father yourself and you know this very well. one has it taken so long to hear the message is that all of us have been listening to? i have been working on this initiative for four years. listening to? i have been working on this initiative forfour years. four yea rs this initiative forfour years. four years ago, we went to our food partners and we said to them we have created these guidelines, we have put a cap on sugar, salt, fat and calories and if you don‘t meet these caps, you won‘t be able to put our characters on your foods. i am here today to talk about not what we want today to talk about not what we want to do but what we have done. in the last four years, we have seen amazing transformation without partners. we had 81% of our foods four years ago having sugar as a
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first ingredient. now it is under 596. first ingredient. now it is under 5%. two yea rs first ingredient. now it is under 5%. two years ago, 50% of the foods that had disney on them were confectionery or sweets. now it is under 15%. so i wouldn‘t say that we have been laid to the party. we are in the party and we are making changes with our partners like with kellogs. are you embarrassed about how much sugar was in the products, for example? we are really focused on where we want to go and i think there has been a greater awareness, wa lt there has been a greater awareness, walt disney co. began his journey in 2006 in the us. really, we stepped it up here in the uk in 2014 to really engage parents and kids.” wa nt to really engage parents and kids.” want to know, for example, if you go to disneyland, you walk in there and it is like a sugar —fest. is it going to go throughout the whole company? i think we need to
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distinguish between the parks which are distinguish between the parks which a re really distinguish between the parks which are really a once—in—a—lifetime or, if you are lucky, a couple of times more than that, experience. which, as parents, we go there and we want to indulge our kids. what we want to do at the parks is make healthy choices easier so on the menus we make it very clear, here is an easier choice. we are defaulting the kids‘s meals to healthy alternatives like fruit, vegetables, water and milk and actually in the us, what we have been doing, six in ten kids‘ meals, even though you can choose as a parent, six in ten default to that healthier choice. what i am focused on is that everyday engagement, what you see in the shelves at the supermarket, we have launched a new range called disney kitchen. it clearly indicates on any product which is compliant with our food guidelines, it says to mum and dad,
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disney‘s dumbed the thinking for me and it has lot with assault, it has lower the sugar. the kids will see mr incredible on the box or whatever character they love. thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alpa patel. as we‘ve been hearing, today marks the first anniversary of the finsbury park attack. last night the north london mosque and muslim welfare house were lit up. this morning there will be a minute‘s silence to remember makram ali who was killed and nine others injured when a van was driven into a crowd a year ago. police are still trying to confirm if three young men, who died after being struck by a train near brixton yesterday, were graffiti artists. spray cans were found alongside their bodies, which were discovered near loughborough junction station yesterday morning. investigations are continuing
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after the facades of several buildings collapsed on a busy pavement in north—west london yesterday. it happened on brent street in hendon — it‘s believed nobody was hurt. academics at university college london say stress at home is more likely to cause a child to comfort—eat or lose their appetite than their genetics. the research suggests genes are largely unimportant and instead, environmental factors, such as home life, have the biggest influence. today is the first day of racing at royal ascot. race—goers have been warned that extra security is in place following past disprution at the course. we have 20 sniffer dogs covering every entrance to the racecourse. the chances of being caught are fairly high. it is not an event for taking drugs. it is not an event for getting out of control in terms of what you‘ve drunk. come to royal ascot, enjoy it how it is supposed to enjoy it and you will enjoy it be its maximum. let‘s have a look at
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the travel situation now. 0n the tube — severe delays on the overground — between stratford and richmond and gospel oak and barking 0n the trains — great northern services are suspended london bound — between hertford north and alexandra palace because of a track fault. 0n the roads — this is the approach to the blackwall tunnel, traffic there building during the rush hour. 0n the m3 — heavy traffic betweenj3 for lightwater and the m25 — because of an accident, queues back to bagshot. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we had quite a warm and humid night last night. many temperatures didn‘t drop below 18. a warm start this morning. mostly dry, cloudy and, yes, it‘s going to stay rather humid as well. now, i say mostly dry — there may be a spot of light rain and drizzle this morning on the thicker areas of the cloud. it‘s moving out from the south and the west. now, it won‘t be until later on this afternoon we might start to see something a bit brighter, some sunshine just as we head towards the evening. the temperature, though, despite the cloud is still reaching 24 celsius. so, some sunshine potentially before it sets, then overnight, clear spells at first,
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then the cloud will start to increase again from the south and the west. quite misty and murky. minimum temperature again feeling humid, between 14 and 16 celsius. so a rather grey start tomorrow, it looks like the cloud‘s going to stay around during the course of wednesday. still have the humid air, though — 24 the maximum. then a cold front sweeps through overnight wednesday into thursday morning, so the temperature feeling a bit fresher for thursday. still plenty of dry weather and temperatures warming up into next week. i‘m back in half an hour. if you are heading out, have lovely morning. hello, this is breakfast, with louie minchin and charlie stayt. here is a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. england have won their opening game at the football world cup, although it took a stoppage—time goalfrom captain harry kane to secure the victory. it turned out to be a nervy night, but manager gareth southgate declared that the win
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gives his squad a great platform to build on. england‘s next match is against panama on sunday. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis, suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government‘s approach is out of date. yesterday the prime minister said that there was a very good reason for the current rules on cannabis and other drugs. passengers on northern rail services are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes injust one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in dispute about the role of guards. it follows existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. we wa nt we want meaningful talks. 0ur members don‘t want to take
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industrial action and inconvenience passengers, but in the last six months only two times have we had any dialogue with the company, and yet nothing has happened at about. that to me is an absolute disgrace. it is shambolic way they are negotiating. the way they are operating the train service is shambolic in the way they operate in the negotiations is shambolic. a minute‘s silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. the prime minister described what happened as an attack on us all. universities should stop using predicted grades when people are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that about three quarters of applicants got worse results than their teachers had predicted. the water regulator, 0fwat, has severely criticised four water companies for their response to the storm nicknamed the ‘beast
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from the east.‘ the watchdog says poor planning meant customers were badly let down. some people were left without water for days following the big freeze and thaw. those are the main stories. let‘s go back to our lead story, the big story of the day, really. all that expectation, and then there was a good bit and then a mediocre bit, and then a great ending.” good bit and then a mediocre bit, and then a great ending. i reckon you‘ve got a job in sports reporting! a mediocre bit! i would say there is a good bit, a mediocre bit, a bad bet, a nerve racking bit, and a brilliant ending. it kind of sums up the game. they never do it the easy way. who was the most important on the pitch? there is only one harry kane. and it was all down to who else but harry kane, who scored an injury—time winner
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against tunisia. 2—1 the final score, as england win the opening match at a major tournament for the first time since 2006. england‘s players are now back at their training base in repino, just north of st petersburg. it is where our sports correspondent david 0rnstein is. david, relief as much as anything? indeed, sally. it is the gulf of finland, and behind the camera, about 20 minutes down the coast is england‘s base, deep in the forest. they arrived back here at 6am, 4am uk time and they will train later, a light recovery session after their exertions of last night. they don‘t make it easy for us, do they, england? make it easy for us, do they, england ? they make it easy for us, do they, england? they got the result they needed, harry kane opening the scoring with his first goal in a major tournament. it then didn‘t go to plan, kyle walker conceding a
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penalty, and that was put away by tunisia 41— one, against the run of play. england had squandered many chances —— 1—1. they kept us on our toes, but harry kane popped up late in the 91st minute, just when we thought it would be a disappointing start to the world cup, and he won it. that is his fifth goal in four gains in international football, it. that is his fifth goal in four gains in internationalfootball, his eighth goal in six games as captain, and his 15th in 25 overall. we are very grateful for harry kane, and gareth southgate, the manager, certainly was relieved that england are off to a good start, with the likes of germany, argentina, was ill and spainfailing likes of germany, argentina, was ill and spain failing to win their opening matches. it doesn‘t matter how it came about, but southgate was so grateful for harry kane. he's a top, top striker, isn't he? i'm delighted for him, because if he doesn't score tonight, we'll ask questions about him not scoring goals in tournament
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football, won't we? it's greatly have him in the team, and he took his goals really, really well. thank you very much to david, at the england camp for us this morning. loads of reaction from the players after the match, from jesse lingard, captain harry kane, and england also posted a picture of gareth soutgate phoning home after the match. we got a tweet and a picture of the pile in, all the players piling in. i don‘t like this, sorry. ijust think, you know, he is precious. don‘t pile in on harry kane, don‘t hurt him! that is a great picture, and harry kane‘s own picture from last night. my favourite is definitely this. gareth southgate, the lights are going down, inside the lights are going down, inside the stadium after the match, it is empty, he is phoning home. you can‘t quite see it from this angle, but the look on his face, the smile on his face, it is relief, joy, everything. really lovely. let‘s talk in more detail about england‘s
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performance and what they have to do next. let‘s say good morning to the former england and everton midfielder leon 0sman. really lovely to have you here. they don‘t make it easy, do they? it was a nerve racking start, as charlie said, but in the middle it really was nailbiting for england fans. yes, that is what we seem to do at every major tournament. we all end up every major tournament. we all end up finishing the first game with no nails. i thought it was a fantastic start on the front foot, creating chances. we should have scored more than one goal in that period, and thatis than one goal in that period, and that is why it becomes a nervy second half. i had to ask you about southgate‘s decisions in the second half of the match, to put marcus ratchford on and for sterling to come off. —— rashford. ratchford on and for sterling to come off. -- rashford. ithought it was a great decision. sterling had been involved in creating chances but didn‘t seem to have that the sure and around the opposition‘s
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goal and penalty area that rashford does. to bring him on in that period was vital, and him and loftus were involved in getting england back on the front foot in that second half and involved in winning that corner which ultimately got them the winner. the video assistant referee has been hugely important so far, but we saw last night they com pletely but we saw last night they completely missed a couple of horrendous attempts to basically wrestle harry kane to the ground. they did, and before the tournament it was mentioned that the referees would be on the lookout for this, so for not only the referee to miss both occasions, but for the var assistant referees in the studio not to point that out, we have seen that use quite a lot in the tournament so far. the referees have come back and called on the var after the incident, and it is incredible that we we re incident, and it is incredible that we were not awarded a penalty after the fact. can i ask your question, and you may not know the answer, but what is meant to happen if the video referee see something? willa pass
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that on? into referee's year, and play will not start until the referee is satisfied they have been checked by the var officials in the studio —— referee‘s ear. i think it was even mentioned that the var were looking at certainly the first incident and deemed that there was no foul on there. it seems incredible considering how you see it. they checked at least two of those incidents and didn‘t think there was anything the referee needed to do, which is incredible. in the other match, your old team—mate lukaku... in the other match, your old team—mate lu ka ku. .. they look in the other match, your old team—mate lukaku... they look great, but they? they do, albeit up against a weakened panama side. a fantastic first goal by mertens, and then lukaku first goal by mertens, and then lu ka ku took first goal by mertens, and then lukaku took over, a great play by de bruyne, but lu ka ku
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lukaku took over, a great play by de bruyne, but lukaku finding himself in the right spot, as we mentioned about harry kane, but he has pace and power around the area. they were slow in the first half, giving panama the chance to be level at half—time but their quality showed through in the second half. and on the subject of good and bad decision—making and how difficult it is to watch england sometimes, i made a very bad decision last night. ata made a very bad decision last night. at a crucial moment... 89 minutes, you left! in the first six minutes, very early on, harry kane, i thought he was gone. classic bad decision, i decided to go and get a slice of malt loaf. i went to get it, came backin malt loaf. i went to get it, came back in the goal had been scored.” suggest you get malt loaf most if we score while you are out getting malt loaf! just be elsewhere. getting malt loaf. if that is what gets us
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the goal, you can play a heavy part. i like that, there is something in that. 0ur old friend var was centre stage in the sweden—south korea match. the referee didn‘t initially see this as a foul, but changed his mind on reviewing the tape. hard as it was for fans to watch, captain andreas granqvist scored the penalty that gave the swedes a 1—0 win. these are the matches to follow today. at 1:00pm, colombia take onjapan. then at 4:00pm, it is poland versus senegal. and later, hosts russia play egypt, with coverage on bbc one and bbc radio 5live. lots to watch, a great afternoon of football. you are going to mention andy murray. after a year out with a hip injury, andy murray will return to action later. the former world number one will be taking on australian nick kyrgios
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in the first round at queen‘s. the two are friends, which kyrgios thinks will help murray. it will be a great encounter. time for the weather. carol is at an event celebrating the best of british flowers. i think ithinki i think i have spotted a lily behind you. good morning. good morning, you are absolutely right. we are in the garden museum in lambeth and we are here, as you said, for british flowers week. it is a competition, so let‘s meet one of the competitors. hello, helen. good morning. this is a beautiful installation you have here, tell us about it. it is based on the fibonacci spiral, and in the top you have a meadow of flowers in lincolnshire, in cornwall, and some of the plants also from hampshire. so what flowers in here? louise has spotted the. yes, there are some gorgeous lilies from lincolnshire,
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and there are several different types, and people can get closer to the flowers here. if they come along to the museum, they can touch and feel and smell some of the flowers, so feel and smell some of the flowers, so they can learn about them. we we re so they can learn about them. we were talking earlier about the pollen levels, and you have special ones, pollen free lilies. yes, these are pollen free lilies, i chose these because they were in the garden for king charles i's wife, whose nickname was the rose and lily queen. good luck with the competition, and here we have one of thejudges, also a royalflorist. good morning to you. what are you looking for in this competition? there are some lovely displays. looking for in this competition? there are some lovely displaysm is very difficult, absolutely amazing. and what we hoped when we chose these six was that each person
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would bring an individuality, because that is what basically makes a good designer. so we will find it really tough. they have used british flowers, and this is what i think is an important thing. why did you choose this place to hold the competition? i had a few strings i could pull for it to come to the garden museum, for me it is one of the most important places of inspiration for anyone interested in gardens and flowers. i feel that flowers need to get back in touch with their roots, and that is in the garden, in the fields, so the garden museum is the perfect setting, and we we re museum is the perfect setting, and we were blessed that they said yes. it is fabulous, and good luck, i don‘t envy opposition trying to judge those. talking of flowers, the pollen level is high or very high across pollen level is high or very high a cross m ost pollen level is high or very high across most of england and wales. moderate in the south—west of england and northern ireland, central and southern scotland and low in northern scotland. the forecast for today, it is a warm one in the south and we have some rain coming into the north. in the west.
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so this morning we also have a weather front which is sinking southwards. it is a cold front. fresher conditions coming in behind it. if you follow it along, you can see a warm front attached to it, and thatis see a warm front attached to it, and that is producing some rain currently across parts of northern ireland. through the course of the day we will hang on to the muddy conditions in the south. fresher conditions in the south. fresher conditions in the north, and we will start to see some rain coming. first thing this morning we have some sunshine across scotland and northern england. northern ireland, so more cloud with that rain starting to show ten in the west. for the rest of england and it is
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fairly cloudy. again some patchy light rain and drizzle and some eastern murk around the south—west of england and also the channel islands. through the day the cloud will build where we have the sunshine at the moment, and the cloud will break where we have the cloud. across parts of eastern, central and southern england we should see some sunshine with ties up should see some sunshine with ties up to about 24. fresher in the north and windy across the far north of scotland. as we head on through the evening and southwards, producing a lot of rain across northern ireland, scotland, northern england and also north wales. behind it, some clearer skies and ahead of it a fair bit of cloud, but still clear in the far south where it is once again going to bea south where it is once again going to be a muggy night. fresher, more co mforta ble to be a muggy night. fresher, more comfortable conditions across the north. tomorrow we start off with that weather front, again fairly wea k that weather front, again fairly weak as it continues to drift southwards, producing some patchy light rain and drizzle what we will find is that a weather front will start to sink southwards, producing a lot of rain across northern ireland, scotland, northern england and also north wales. behind it, some clearer skies and ahead of it a fair bit of cloud, but still clear in the far south where it is once again going to be a muggy night. fresher, more comfortable conditions across the north. tomorrow we start off with that weather front, again fairly wea k
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off with that weather front, again fairly weak as it continues to drift southwards, producing some patchy light rain and drizzle and also a fair bit of cloud. behind its sunshine but also some showers. the heaviest of which will be across the north and west of scotland where they will merge with hail and some thunder. 0n they will merge with hail and some thunder. on thursday, with high pressure and ireland, it will be fairly settled. we will lose the rain and then get a largely some sunshine. not as warm as we thought it would be, 2728 in the south—east, but more likely to be around 26, which is still pretty warm in my variable amounts of cloud and some sunshine. not as warm as we thought it would be, 27 or 28 in the south—east, but more likely to be around 26, which is still pretty warm in my and in response to you showing us all those lovely flowers, lots of people have been sending us pictures of flowers as well. jinny tweeted us this bunch of flowers that she picked for father‘s day. rebecca sent these beautiful climbing roses on her pergola in essex. and liz sent this camellia. she says it is a bowl of beauty. and liz sent this camellia. she says it‘s a bowl of beauty. they‘re one of europe‘s largest low cost carriers and this morning we‘ve found out that flybe has announced further losses. steph‘s got the latest.
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i thought it was pergola. i am probably wrong. flybe is europe‘s biggest regional airline — but like many in this arena it‘s had a tough year. for the year to the end of march it made a loss of £19.2 million, that compares to a loss of £6.7million the year before. the weather is a big part of the problem with flybe canceling nearly 1000 flights in the first few months of the year. but there was some good news — passenger numbers were up 700,000 to 9.5 million and the amount they‘re making per seat has also gone up. joining us now from our london newsroom is peter morris, chief economist at flightglobal, which provides aviation industry analysis. peter, tell us your thoughts. it is a mixed picture for flybe, isn‘t it? it is. they have been facing the challenges of being neither the kind of network character —— carrier like
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british airways lufthansa, and they are british airways lufthansa, and they a re cost low british airways lufthansa, and they are cost low airline. they are fulfilling the regional market across europe. they are strongly linked into the qut economy. i think i kind of dispute that it is just the weather. —— uk economy. i think it is about the way that aviation is in the economy. it has slumped back in the economy. it has slumped back in the uk and it has had an impact on flybe. and it has made them cut back. they have scaled back their capacity so they are now using their turbo aircraft more than theirjets and sizing those aircraft to the particular routes. you have to accept it is a commercial air transport industry so you have to make money to carry on in operation.
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what do you think the future looks like for flybe? it doesn't look encouraging from march next year whether european commission has already said that uk, unless something happens, will be a third nation. in other words, a status similarto nation. in other words, a status similar to afghanistan. if that is not result, there will be real challenges for flybe because it is europe‘s largest operator. unless it can actually secure the regular treat framework that it needs by march next year. i think there will bea march next year. i think there will be a lot of challenges on the cost and demand signed. —— regular regulatory framework. people will still need to travel around. what will happen? people will have less money to spend. particularly going to you wrote a nominated
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destinations. the other thing is, if he could issue is that crop up like visa or delays in terms of safety checks and so on, all of those things provide a break on the growth ofa—— things provide a break on the growth of a —— aviation. i think flybe will find itself in the middle with a huge range of european destinations. you could end up being a uk—based carrier or continental europe —based carrier or continental europe —based carrier and have difficulty merging the two. what we‘re looking at is 40 yea rs of progress the two. what we‘re looking at is 40 years of progress in terms of aviation across europe. at a stroke, that goes back to the dark days. u nless that goes back to the dark days. unless some different deals get negotiated. peter, thank you for your time. peter morris from flightglobal, aviation industry analysis. an emergency licence allowing 12 year old billy caldwell,
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who has severe epilepsy, to use cannabis oil, has prompted calls for wider access to the treatment. now the former conservative leader william hague has suggested the drug could be legalised. the family of six—year—old alfie dingley, who has a rare form of epilepsy, also want him to be able to use the banned substance. the government says it‘s creating an expert panel to look into individual cases. alfie‘s mother hannah joins us now. thank you forjoining us again. we have spoken to you several times here on breakfast. give us an update. as you know, we met with the prime minister on march 20 when we handed a petition into number ten. she looked me in the eye that day and said to me, they will do everything within the law to allow us to prescribe this medication for my son. the next three months, we have got the best clinicians together in the country we have put in three applications at the cost of £4000 each. we havejumped through every hoop, we have done everything asked of us. she answered that she
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would do this as a compassionate licence application and speedily, that hasn‘t been done. at the moment, we still don‘t know what is happening to my son‘s licence. they have had the application for three months and every time we ask what is happening, the hurdles are changing, the loops are changing, the bureaucracy changes, there is always something else. in that meeting, i felt like my son mattered and ifelt like they wanted him to have his medication but that we would just have to go through a procedure which i accepted because i accept the law andi i accepted because i accept the law and i accept the current procedures that are in place. ifeel like i have been played, at the moment, i really do. you don‘t do that to a mother of a very sick child.” really do. you don‘t do that to a mother of a very sick child. i feel that in some ways, this is a difficult situation for you because i‘m the one hand, we know that billy caldwell has been given an emergency licence. what he think when you see that? i feel compassion, you know,
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any mother of any child father of any mother of any child father of any child with epilepsy, it have to keep them safe. it is a different situation entirely. as i say, we have had an application in process for three months. we have followed the rules and done everything asked of us. we have kept quiet because i absolutely had faith in the system that would give my son his medicine. you know, i just that would give my son his medicine. you know, ijust feel that the that would give my son his medicine. you know, i just feel that the time is for decisions now. we know obviously lord hague were talking at today about a law on cannabis oil. suggesting it should be legalised. would it help your situation? to be honest, there are many mps across the house who have an opinion on cannabis or medical cannabis. my aim is to get my son alfie his medicine. i don‘t want to be drawn on the
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wider debate to stop my son needs it urgently, i am a mother who is suffering, my child is suffering, my family is suffering. this is a medication that is licensed throughout the world and there are so many peer—reviewed research projects that is show that medical cannabis is safe and effective. it is being ignored. my son needs his medicine urgently and that is my priority. talk to us a little bit about alfie and what impact it is having on his health, for example. asi having on his health, for example. as i say, before we went to holland, he was in hospital every week having intravenous steroids which are not licensed to give to children and a neurologist said to us that if we carry on as we are, he will have a heart attack and he could die. that is why i took him to holland to give him a medical cannabis and medical cannabis changed his life. we own situation now that we are painfully and to be on cbd oil only so that he
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isa and to be on cbd oil only so that he is a stable as he can possibly be. i am not prepared to put him in a position that he was before he went to holland but he is still having seizures on a daily basis. but he is more stable than he was but he is still not very well at all. every seizure he has could kill him. that is the reality of epilepsy. it is a dangerous, dangerous condition. i have proved true six months of being in holland that he responds to this and it can stop his seizures. that should be enough. that should be enough for him to have his medicine. thank you so much again for your time here in breakfast. i am going to read another home office statement, particularly about alfie‘s cased. they have worked closely with the families of alfie dingley and billy caldwell and they are sympathetic to the difficult —— difficulties they face. their priority remains that alfie receives his treatment in a safeway based on the advice of a senior police ——
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safe weight based on advice from a senior clinician. —— safe way. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alpa patel. as we‘ve been hearing, today marks the first anniversary of the finsbury park attack. last night the north london mosque and muslim welfare house were lit up. this morning there will be a minute‘s silence to remember makram ali — who was killed and 9 others injured — when a van was driven into a crowd a year ago. police are still trying to confirm if three young men, who died after being struck by a train near brixton yesterday, were graffiti artists. spray cans were found alongside their bodies, which were discovered near loughborough junction station yesterday morning. investigations are continuing after the facades of several buildings collapsed on a busy pavement in north west london yesterday. it happened on brent street in hendon. it‘s believed nobody was hurt. academics at university college london say stress at home is more likely to cause a child to comfort—eat or lose their appetite — than their genetics.
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the research suggests genes are largely unimportant and instead, environmental factors, such as home life, have the biggest influence. today is the first day of racing at royal ascot. racegoers have been warned that extra security is in place following past disprution at the course. with 20 sniffer dogs covering every entrance to the racecourse, the chances of being caught are fairly high. it‘s not an event for taking drugs, it‘s not an event for getting out of control in terms of what you‘ve drunk. come to royal ascot, enjoy it like it‘s supposed to be enjoyed, and actually, they‘ll probably find that that is exactly how you enjoy it to its maximum. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — the overground is part suspended between richmond and gunnersbury. and severe delays between stratford and gunnersbury and barking and gospel 0ak. 0n the trains — great northern services are suspended london bound — between hertford north and alexandra palace. 0n the roads — the m4 is slow at the chiswick roundabout, due to an accident. 0n the m3 — heavy traffic betweenj3 for lightwater and the m25 — because of an accident,
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queues back to bagshot. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we had quite a warm and humid night last night. many temperatures didn‘t drop below 18. a warm start this morning. mostly dry, cloudy and, yes, it‘s going to stay rather humid as well. now, i say mostly dry — there may be a spot of light rain and drizzle this morning on the thicker areas of the cloud. it‘s moving out from the south and the west. now, it won‘t be until later on this afternoon we might start to see something a bit brighter, some sunshine just as we head towards the evening. the temperature, though, despite the cloud is still reaching 24 celsius. so, some sunshine potentially before it sets, then overnight, clear spells at first, then the cloud will start to increase again from the south and the west. quite misty and murky. minimum temperature again feeling humid, between 14 and 16 celsius. so a rather grey start tomorrow, it looks like the cloud‘s going to stay around during the course of wednesday. still have the humid air, though — 24 the maximum. then a cold front sweeps
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through overnight wednesday into thursday morning, so the temperature feeling a bit fresher for thursday. still plenty of dry weather and temperatures warming up into next week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. england‘s hero captain harry kane scores twice to give his team a winning world cup start. an injury time goal... relief for the manager... and of course delight for the fans. 0range match this is what these matches are about the world cup, you go into the last really buzzing. it could though have been so much easierfor england. they missed plenty of first half chances, and var missed a couple
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of nailed—on penalties. good morning, it‘s tuesday 19th june. also this morning. time to legalise cannabis — a former conservative leader calls for a decisive change in the law after a boy with epilepsy is given a special licence to use cannabis oil. delays, cancellations and now a strike — there‘s more disruption for passengers on northern rail. more disruption on northern rail services — this time staff strike over a dispute about guards on trains. retailer debenhams has put out a profit warning, of further sign that more high street stores are struggling. and the weather with carol. good morning, i‘m here from the gardening museum in lambeth, it is british flowers week and will be taking a closer look at flowers
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before the end of the programme. rain today in scotland and northern ireland, cloudy start for england and wales but brightening in the east later. more details 15 minutes. thank you carol. first, our top story. two goals from captain harry kane gave england victory in their world cup opener. it was a nervy—night in volgograd but manager gareth southgate declared that the win gives his squad a "great platform to build on". 0ur sports news corresponent natalie pirks was watching the action. captain, leader, not yet a legend. harry kane was one of nine players making their world cup debuts, but these young lions aren‘t afraid to get stuck in. after the miss came the breakthrough. a superb save fell at the feet of, who else? commentator: put in now, though, and put in by captain kane. kane does not miss from there. no time for cuddles, though. there was a match to put to bed. but as yet more chances went begging, a stray arm gave lacklustre opponents hope. and the referee‘s pointing to the spot.
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with just three caps to his name, jordan pickford almost became a hero. and he scores. right in the corner. would england have the heart to fight back? some tunisian tackles were more suited to the rugby field and yet more english chances fell by the wayside. as the midges went to town, england were lacking bite. we‘d seen how this one ends too many times. 0r had we? maguire went for it and it is in from harry kane again. two goals for the captain. that could make a huge difference to the way this world cup goes for england. talk about a release of tension. it went down well back home too. obviously, i want to prove myself on every big stage, every big moment, so it was nice to get a goal early on and then, yeah, no better way to win a game than a last—minute win. well, that was england‘s first world cup opening—match win since 2006, but didn‘t
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they leave it late? they will have learnt some important lessons too — chiefly, that carelessness can cost. natalie pirks, bbc news, volgograd. let‘s go to volgograd now. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford is outside the stadium in volgograd where the match took place. sarah ifi sarah if i see you waving your arms i will take it as an early—morning celebration after last night and i ta ke celebration after last night and i take it it‘s because of the midges, they were around last night but they did not stop england getting the result! they did not stop england and they won‘t stop is speaking although i have to keep swatting them, it‘s quite a battle with the midges. the game went as england hoped, with a win for england, you can see behind me, this is the centre of volgograd, with a fan centre, it‘s very quiet, i suppose the fans may did you were busy
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celebrating late into the night. we could hear them from our hotel, going strong into the night. a great atmosphere in the stadium, a huge roar when the winning goal went in. and great celebrations in the streets outside. the fans were wary of coming to rush after all the trouble at the euros in france in 2016 winchburgh people off and the politics between russia and the uk at the moment. yet those who have made it here say they have had an incredible time, the atmosphere has been extremely warm and welcoming and the match result was just what they were looking for. sarah, thank you, we can finish on some shots of celebrating fans. thank you. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis — suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government‘s approach is out of date. let‘s speak to our political correspondent ben wright who‘s in westminster. this is interesting because this seems to be quite a differentiation
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between various politicians, good morning. good morning louise. yes, although certainly on the question of the medicinal use of cannabis there is now growing pressure on the government, on theresa may to do something. a very strong intervention from william hague. he calls the current law is indefensible, ridiculous and utterly out of date. the prime minister has promised a case—by—case review of the way cannabis can be used in medical circumstances but i think mr hagueis medical circumstances but i think mr hague is echoing many politicians across the spectrum by demanding
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much more as a result of this case people are talking about. it is interesting that he goes much further and says there needs to be a look at the whole recreational use of cannabis as well. the long running debate that has bubbled away figures, he says it‘s time for it to be faced, asking the police to take cannabis of the streets is po intless, he says it is like asking the army to reclaim the british empire, it won‘t work. he mentions countries like canada that have recently legalised use of cannabis and says this is where the tories need to use of cannabis and says this is where the tories need to be .theresa touch any drugs legislation at all and .theresa touch any drugs legislation at allandi .theresa touch any drugs legislation at all and i do not think she will be keen to now. although this debate is definitely becoming mothers of russ and i think there is pressure on the government to do something now. thank you. passengers on northern rail services are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes in just one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in dispute about the role of guards. it follows existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. a minute‘s silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. the prime minister described what happened as "an attack on us all". universities should stop using predicted grades when people
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are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that about three quarters of applicants got worse results than their teachers had predicted. it is eight minutes past eight. let‘s get more on england‘s victory in their opening world cup match. if you did not know already, they won! just let that sink in! it is worth it! the score was 2—1. former england player matthew upson joins us now from moscow. thank you so much forjoining us. the first time they‘d won an opening match at a major tournament since 2006. ed and! what is the feeling? how much pressure was there to do
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this? so much pressure on the team, but the feeling is great. you can ta ke but the feeling is great. you can take all the positives from the performance, the start of the game, the way he went about trying to beat tunisia thought was outstanding. it gives a lot of hope to everyone, i think. -- gives a lot of hope to everyone, i think. —— the way we went about it. harry kane is so modest and came out of it so well in the post—match interviews but as captain he scored both goals. both times that he went for the goal comedies scored. a terrific way to lead the side isn‘t it? absolutely. i feel his attitude is his star quality. the way he plays, he never gives up, he‘s got a great man about him. he is our captain and our goal—scorer. we can talk about him but he did deliver last night. you have to spread that across other players, jordan henderson had an outstanding game andi henderson had an outstanding game and i thought kieran trippier from
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the side delivered quality balls into the box and had a solid game. they‘ve got back on the plane with this fantastic win in the bag, how will that affect their psychology going forwards? of course it will give you confidence. you want to get that first game out of the way. it isa that first game out of the way. it is a young team. a lot of them are unknown at this level in terms of world cup experience. it will have done and the power of good. going into that second game without a win will have put so much pressure on the match. there will still be pressure but hopefully they‘ll be able to relax, get into their football and have a really good game again. with the world cup a lot of people who don‘t normally watch football watch the sport. i know it isa football watch the sport. i know it is a silly detail but if we could see the pictures of the celebration pile—up? this was immediately after the first goal. there will be quite a few people seeing these stills
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where you can seek harry kane‘s head poking out of the bottom with nine people on top of him! is that i worry? it does sound a bit silly but they do go for it! i was a bit worried for him! you were concerned that he might get injured! i think he will be fine. everyone enjoys a good pile up and a good celebration after a goal that is important. plenty more of that from me! we a lwa ys plenty more of that from me! we always refer back to the referee but some of those tackles, particularly against parry keen, what do you make of them? —— against harry kane. against parry keen, what do you make of them? —— against harry kanem was so obvious. and when you look at the penalty england conceded with kyle walker, for me, the challenges, the holding and the grappling going on in the box were much clearer incidence of a penalty and
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especially with var and the technology that we‘ve got at the world cup, you would have hoped that one of the var referees would have raised that to the attention of the referee to take action. and matthew connko referee to take action. and matthew connolly you are in moscow and we are not, have you got a sense of the world cup vibe? —— matthew, you are in moscow and we are not. how is it feeling for you and the people there following england ? feeling for you and the people there following england? it has been outstanding, i must say. since i got here, the vibe, it‘s a world cup. you could put it anywhere in the world and people flock there, the atmosphere, some of the mexican supporters after the game against germany, some are still partying around red square two days later! it's around red square two days later! it‘s very friendly. it‘s a great vibe. the atmosphere in moscow is great. and it makes a wonderful backdrop as we talk to you. thank you matthew upson. joining us there
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from moscow. it‘s 13 minutes past eight. these are the matches to follow today. at 1pm colombia take onjapan. then at 4pm it‘s poland versus senegal. and later, hosts russia play egypt, with coverage on bbc one and bbc radio 5 live. that match will be a big one in russia of course. you can follow and wherever you are. we are celebrating flowers this morning and carol is at a special event. good morning, i‘m in the garden museum at lambeth, the big com petition is going on with six installations being judged, this is one of the competitors, sarah. tell me a bit about this installation. i wanted to create something that you didn‘tjust installation. i wanted to create something that you didn‘t just walk past, that you stopped and took a moment and had a good look at. we‘ve
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got harsh course. it‘s not traditionally something florists use much but i wanted something that would contrast beautifully with the soft romantic garden roses which smell amazing at this time of year. and all british grown. absolutely, i try to only work with british flowers, i just try to only work with british flowers, ijust think try to only work with british flowers, i just think they are com pletely flowers, i just think they are completely beautiful and things that are in season are so much better. you have this lovely big circles of people are drawn in, was that deliberate? i wanted people to be intrigued as to what was in the box and have a close look and get right in theirand and have a close look and get right in their and smell the sweet peas and the mint, the jasmine and the roses and get a feel for british flowers a nd roses and get a feel for british flowers and what they are about. what kind of brief did you get about what thejudges were what kind of brief did you get about what the judges were looking for? nam, we were just told what size the space would be and then we had free rein to come up with a plan. how important is it to have british
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flowers because a lot of our flowers come from holland. enormously. we have growers in this country who are doing an amazing job and flowers in season, i think, doing an amazing job and flowers in season, ithink, are doing an amazing job and flowers in season, i think, are the best you can get. they worked tirelessly and create the most beautiful flowers in my opinion and the cost is minute compared with flying them across the world from holland to the flower markets. that's a good point. very good luck sarah, it‘s a great installation and as well as this one we will look at the shadow—box later. so many flowers around later, i'll later. so many flowers around later, i‘ll tell you about the pollen levels today. they are low across northern scotland. the forecast for today... fairly warm in the south, quite muggy. some rain coming in from the west. you can see why we have got a
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weather front moving south, a cold front, behind it, fresher conditions coming in. there is a wiggle on the front producing rain in northern ireland and later across scotland as well. this morning, for scotland and northern england, beautiful start to the day, sunshine around, a few showers in the north—west. northern ireland, afair showers in the north—west. northern ireland, a fair bit of cloud producing showers. for the rest of england and wales, cloudy start, patchy light rain and drizzle and low cloud and misty conditions across the channel islands and south—west england. it will brighten up south—west england. it will brighten up in central, southern and eastern england in afternoon. for northern ireland and scotland, the rain coming in. some of that could be heavy. it will be windy in the far north as well. as a result, fresher. this evening and overnight, the rain will be happier in northern ireland, scotland, slipping south now across northern england and north wales.
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clear skies following on behind. cloud building ahead of it, still quite clear skies in the far south. muqqy quite clear skies in the far south. muggy in the south, fresher in the north. tomorrow, we start with the weather front coming south, increasing amounts of cloud and patchy light rain and drizzle, not getting to the far south until much later. brightening up behind it with sunshine. but beefy showers in the north and west of scotland, some merging and also hail understand and lightning. —— hailand thunderand lightning. —— hailand thunderand lightning. thursday, high pressure across ireland, so the weather will be fairly settled, cloud but equally sunshine as well. we have a new game in the studio, guess the flowers on your dress. is it a rose? no.
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in the studio, guess the flowers on your dress. is ita rose? no. it could be. think it is a lily? i have not spent that much time looking at it. why would you? i don‘t know what i have got, i have got flowers as well. we often were the same thing. i have got daisies? maybe buttercups? i have got daisies? maybe buttercu ps? cannot really i have got daisies? maybe buttercups? cannot really see mine. you have got pictures of flowers that have been sent in this morning. rebecca‘s sent us these climbing roses surrounding her garden table. in cornwall, mark‘s taken this photograph of an aquilegia. i knew that! and this is a clematis in birmingham are sent in by linda. 0ther in birmingham are sent in by linda. other people might say it differently. i‘ve got no idea! we are not
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specialists in flowers. ifeel like iam the specialists in flowers. ifeel like i am the flower correspondent but getting it wrong. shall i tell you something i do know about? debenhams have put out a profit warning. 180 stores across the uk and ireland. the third time they have put out a profit warning and it means... it is not they are not making money but they are not making as much as they we re they are not making as much as they were expecting to at this point. theyissue were expecting to at this point. they issue something to the markets called a profit warning to tell shareholders that it has not been as good as they thought. the reason they are saying this because of other competitors discounting, all the sales you are seeing, and the fa ct we the sales you are seeing, and the fact we are not spending as much in the shops. the chief executive this morning has talked about how challenging the market is to be in at the moment and they do not see it getting better soon. but they are in the middle of a turnaround plan, they are trying to focus more on food and beauty and less on the
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fashion side where it is much tougher because there were so much discounting. they want to limit the number of promotions and focus on the online side of the business as well. they are in the middle of that, but not working so far if you look at what is happening with the sales profit warning, but one of the traditional retailers we are talking about with the department store style a nd about with the department store style and they are struggling to keep up with the times, they have a lot of property. you get a sense there is a change going on. lots of companies having to do something. got to fit with the changing times. james wentworth—stanley was 21 when he took his own life, following a short bout of depression. today, a new support centre named after him will be opened by the duke of cambridge. james‘ place will provide therapy for men experiencing suicidal thoughts. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to visit the centre with james‘ family. almost 12 years after his death, james‘ place is about to open. wow, what a change.
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james was my older brother. he had a relatively short bout of anxiety which gradually became increasingly severe and took him to take his own life. james‘ place is the first of its kind. it is nonclinical which means it won‘t provide medical treatment but free therapy for men experiencing suicidal crisis. the design is so... it encourages you to just sit down and relax. the building in liverpool city centre‘s taken 18 months to renovate. seeing it today, ifeel quite emotional because it has that very peaceful, calm environment that i really wanted us to create. i think it is absolutely the right place. the compassionate and the effective way of dealing with somebody who is feeling at their lowest ebb and feeling as though they might
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wish to take their own lives. the uk suicide rate has recently dropped, but men are still three times more likely than women to take their own life. in the uk, on average, 84 men do so every week. perhaps women are more skilled at getting the support that they need before they get to that stage, so men often get to that stage of feeling overwhelmed before they‘ve even told anybody that they are struggling. being in liverpool means the centre will work alongside mersey care, an nhs foundation trust that has launched a zero—suicide strategy. we are trying to provide a safe and homely environment where men who are in a suicidal crisis can come and receive the support that they need. i saw no other way out. i didn't see anything beyond that. john has tried to take his own life on three occasions. you get lost in the system. you can be sectioned, locked away, and that is not what depressive males need. somewhere like james' place
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where you can come and talk would be a much better environment. it is not a clinical environment. you're not going to feel terrible coming here. you want to come here. 3000 miles done, ten to go. in december, 2016, the day before the tenth anniversary ofjames' death, we set off on a transatlantic row. we always had james at the forefront of our minds for the whole duration. james would wholeheartedly love this project and he would be extremely proud of his brother rowing the atlantic to fund it. so i feeljames is very much part of this project. tim muffett, bbc news, liverpool. if the issues raised in tim‘s report affect you or your family, and you would like details of organisations that offer advice and support, you can go online
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to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. if you have just caught that report, you can watch bbc breakfast on iplayer, or you want anyone else to watch it, they can do that. lots of thoughts coming in about that england result last night, roller—coaster of emotions. how did you describe it earlier? i can‘t remember. whatever it was, it was brilliant! a great start, mediocre middle, and the right result. let us look at some of the tweets sent out overnight. we have been looking at this all day, pioline, pile up. i think you can vaguely see harry kane right underneath that ——
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pile in, pile up. that picture is on the front page of most of the papers. those two images, by way of com plete papers. those two images, by way of complete contrast, going back, that one there, the moment of calm, the crowds have gone, gareth southgate who has come into this match, he knew he had an exciting squad, what would happen when they got out on the pitch? how could he influence things? he has been a player. he described it, as a boy, he watched england perform, as a player, you played for them, now the manager. this is the moment when he is taking a deep breath at the end, he has got the win, phoning home. the other thing making headlines this morning, the bugs. you cannot see them. quite
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extraordinary. absolute torment, not only the players, running around, which helps a bit, but for the correspondence, it has been horrible. more from the world cup across the bbc today, lots of games on. also coming up later... ellise chappell and harry richardson will be here, to tell us about morwenna and drake‘s story of forbidden love, in the latest series of poldark. and they will be talking to us at the bit about filming a scene with a galloping horse along the cliff edge which sounds produced scary. chakra pretty scary. and we have managed to get a clip without his top off expect it is not that difficult. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. cooler fresher conditions this
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morning across scotland, northern ireland, the cloud and increase into the afternoon, some rain spreading in as well, after cloudy start with some rain and drizzle across england and wales things brightening into the afternoon, it‘s still pretty warm here, maximum temperature is 22-24dc warm here, maximum temperature is 22—24dc although pressure further north, 14—17d. through this evening the rain will intensify as it moves further into scotland into the far north of england, perhaps north wales also seeing rain and drizzle.
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temperature is fairly muggy going into wednesday morning but gradually doing wednesday this area of rain will move further south and will fizzle out as it do so. some brighter skies to the south—east, that‘s where temperatures were once again go up into the temperatures, unit as the oranges and the greens further north behind this weather front the rain where temperatures will be more like about 15 to 19 degrees on wednesday afternoon. that fresher air will continue to spread further south sewers are going to this day, all of us will be united under the influence of this cooler air, afine under the influence of this cooler air, a fine start to the day on thursday with a lot of sunshine around, that northerly wind will bring in some clout as the day goes on. still bright conditions into the afternoon, it should be dry for most of us, temperatures down by a few degrees in the south east, further north is similar temperatures,
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16-19dc, that's all north is similar temperatures, 16—19dc, that‘s all from me, have a good goodbye. hello, you are with sunday brunch this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben bland. the tit—for—tat trade war between the us and china escalates — america threatens a further 10% tariffs on $200 billion worth of chinese goods. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday 19 june. .. the threats are going back and forth and it is seen as a major escalation in the row over trade which threatens to take the us and china into an all—out trade war. also in the programme... the money in marajuana — canada approves laws
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